Kajstaden Tower is 8.5 storeys high, and all its parts are made of cross-laminated timber.
Kajstaden Tower is 8.5 storeys high, and all its parts are made of cross-laminated timber.

First residents move into Sweden’s tallest timber building

Designed by CF Møller Arcitects, the building is a landmark for the area and a benchmark for a sustainable future

CF Møller Architects is behind Sweden’s tallest timber building, which is now accepting its first tenants. Made of solid timber and situated in Västerås, an hour from Stockholm, the building is a landmark for the area and a benchmark for a sustainable future.

Timber construction means sustainability, according to CF Møller Architects. In recent years, the Scandinavian-based architectural company has focused on the use of timber in construction, as this can create huge CO2 savings. Buildings made of timber also have a positive effect on the indoor climate and the people living within.

Kajstaden Tower is 8.5 storeys high, with an elevated ground floor and a double height top floor. All parts of the building, viz., walls, beams, balconies, lifts and stairwells, are made of cross-laminated timber. The project was developed in collaboration with Martinsons, Bjerking and Consto AB, with Slättö Förvaltning as the client.

The building in Kajstaden constitutes a new chapter in the history of construction, as it is currently Sweden’s tallest solid-timber building. Through research projects and our other timber projects we have focused on innovation and contributed towards developing ways of realising high-rise buildings made of timber. Industrial timber technology also provides architects with better tools for designing beautiful houses that boast a high degree of detail,” says Ola Jonsson, associate partner at CF Møller Architects.

The advantages of timber include the fact that it is a renewable raw material, and that buildings made of solid timber have very low energy and carbon footprints. Use of CNC-milled solid timber and glulam constitutes a high-precision technology and provides an airtight – and thus energy-efficient – building without adding other materials to the walls. The low weight of timber also means fewer deliveries to the construction site and, thus, a safer, quieter and more efficient working environment during construction.

There are four flats on each floor of the building, and each floor has taken three craftsmen an average of three days to put it together. Mechanical joints and screws have been used, which means that the building can later be taken apart and the materials can be reused.

“The total carbon-dioxide savings from use of solid wood instead of concrete are estimated at 550 tonnes of CO2 over the building’s life,” says Rob Marsh, sustainability manager, CF Møller Architects.

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